Chlamydia trachomatis

Not to be confused with chlamydophila, another genus of pathogenic bacteria

Background

  • Most common STD in the United States[1]
  • Asymptomatic in > 50% of infected individuals
  • Risk factors[1]
    • Age <26 most prevalent group
    • Cervical ectopy
    • New or multiple sexual partners
    • Inconsistent or lack of use of barrier protection
    • Early coitarche

Complications

Clinical Features

Differential Diagnosis

Dysuria

Sexually transmitted diseases

Evaluation

  • Endocervical or urethral swab
  • Urine chlamydia test
  • Speculum exam

Management

Doxycycline is contraindicated in pregnancy[2]

Not Pregnant

Pregnant

Disposition

  • Discharge
  • Avoid sex for 7 days to prevent transmission
  • Partners in the previous 60 days should all be notified/tested/treated[1]
  • Rescreen in 3 months

See Also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Keegan MB, Diedrich JT, Peipert JF. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection: Screening and Management. Journal of clinical outcomes management : JCOM. 2014;21(1):30-38.
  2. CDC 2015 Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/chlamydia.htm