Tactical combat casualty care: Difference between revisions

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==Background==
==Background==
*Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is a set of evidence-based guidelines for trauma care in a tactical or combat environment.
*Developed and updated by the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC), a division of the US Department of Defense Joint Trauma System (JTS).
*Goal is to reduce preventable combat deaths.
*Guidelines are divided into three "phases of care".
==Phases of Care==
*[[Care under fire]]
*[[Care under fire]]
*[[Tactical field care]]
*[[Tactical field care]]
*[[Tactical evacuation care]]
*[[Tactical evacuation care]]
==Assessment and Triage==
*Rather than typical "ABC" approach to trauma assessment, TCCC prioritizes massive hemorrhage
*MARCH acronym is used to prioritize treatment:
**'''M''' - Massive hemorrhage
**'''A''' - Airway
**'''R''' - Respiration
**'''C''' - Circulation
**'''H''' - Head/Hypothermia


==See Also==
==See Also==
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*[[Nine line CASEVAC]]
*[[Nine line CASEVAC]]
*[[Military emergency medicine]]
*[[Military emergency medicine]]
==External Links==
*[http://cotccc.com/ Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC)]


==References==
==References==

Revision as of 22:20, 27 May 2017

Background

  • Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) is a set of evidence-based guidelines for trauma care in a tactical or combat environment.
  • Developed and updated by the Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care (CoTCCC), a division of the US Department of Defense Joint Trauma System (JTS).
  • Goal is to reduce preventable combat deaths.
  • Guidelines are divided into three "phases of care".

Phases of Care

Assessment and Triage

  • Rather than typical "ABC" approach to trauma assessment, TCCC prioritizes massive hemorrhage
  • MARCH acronym is used to prioritize treatment:
    • M - Massive hemorrhage
    • A - Airway
    • R - Respiration
    • C - Circulation
    • H - Head/Hypothermia

See Also

External Links

References